The origins of carpet weaving in Central Asia date back to the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC.

 

Museum of the History of Carpet Weaving in Bukhara – located in the architectural monument (XII-XVI century) – Magoki Attori mosque, not far from the ancient Shahrud canal, near the Sarrafon trade dome. The exposition was opened in 1991, it demonstrates various types of traditional carpet weaving, carpentry and felting Central Asian peoples. In the 19th and 20th centuries, the carpet carpets of the Uzbek tribes “Mitan”, “Yuz”, “Kurama”, and “Naiman” became very popular in Central Asia.

The museum collection consists of 104 samples of carpet products used in the everyday life of the peoples of Uzbekistan – Uzbeks, Tajiks, Turkmen, Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, Central Asian Arabs and Uighurs. The collection is subdivided into types: carpet carpets – “gilam”, high-pile – “julhirs” and carpet items, various in technique and color. Being excellent examples of decorative and applied art, the collection of carpets and carpet items of the museum is represented by well-known schools: bashir, kizil-oyek, tekke, yomud, salor, ersari, kizil ayak abound in various motives. The museum collection consists of 104 samples of carpet products used in the everyday life of the peoples of Uzbekistan – Uzbeks, Tajiks, Turkmen, Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, Central Asian Arabs and Uighurs. The collection is subdivided into types: carpet carpets – “gilam”, high-pile – “julhirs” and carpet items, various in technique and color. Being excellent examples of decorative and applied art, the collection of carpets and carpet items of the museum is represented by well-known schools: bashir, kizil-oyek, tekke, yomud, salor, ersari, kizil ayak abound in various motives. A distinctive feature of the carpets of Bukhara design is an ornament in the form of abstract geometric shapes, patterns and patterns characteristic of nomadic Turkmen tribes. Carpets, carpets, Khurdzhins, joynozy, chuval, felt and other items of the museum collection are woven from woolen, silk and cotton threads.

The traditions of the art of agricultural peoples influenced the style of products, and was manifested in the construction of ornamental patterns, which featured tribal symbolism, heraldic compositions of animals and birds, and geometric motifs — a hyrex, including such elements as hexagons, circular rosettes, and lattice patterns.

 

Address: Bukhara, st. Naqshband (near the Sarafon trade dome)

Telephone: 8 (365) 224-15-91

Website: bukhara-museum.uz

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